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Bringing Your Cat To The Vet

Pet Emergency

Every cat owner knows how difficult it can be to get your cat to the vet! We may love their personality at home, but cats are often stubborn and uncomfortable in situations where they do not feel that they are in control. Transporting a cat is something that requires a lot of planning, so we want to share some tips with you.

Sometimes, you will have to transport your cat to routinary checkups with the vet or for a veterinary emergency, and the best time to learn how to do so is not right then and there. 

Read along to learn more about what you can do to make cat transportation much easier for you and on your cat.

Traveling With a Cat Carrier

Cats that grow up inside of homes are not very keen on the idea of enclosed spaces, such as travel carriers. This is one of the main reasons why cats are so uncomfortable during their visits to your trusted Trabuco Canyon veterinarian.

They may feel they’re trapped in the confined space of your choice of a travel carrier. Still, this is extremely necessary. 

You know how we make sure children are safely buckled up to their car chairs to avoid any accidents with them jumping around? The same is true for cats. Unrestrained cats can be a distraction; a dangerous one at that.

We want to make sure your cat grows used to the space of a travel carrier so they can feel comfortable during any trips you make. Most cats don’t agree with a harness, so the carrier or crate might work best.

Pet EmergencyWe suggest you choose a crate with a wide opening to get them inside without too much trouble. Maybe you should consider one made of plastic or another hard material that’s more sustainable to avoid problems with scratching.

Regardless of the material you choose, one critical factor is space. You want to get a carrier that gives your cat enough space to sit inside and turn around whenever they like.

To get your cat used to the carrier, you could leave it open in your house and place their favorite treats and toys inside so they feel inclined to explore the area. Once your cat feels comfortable going in for treats, try placing their food bowl a bit deeper inside to help your cat explore more of the space. 

The goal is to let the cat stay inside for as long as required and that they’re ok with the idea of going back to a space where they can feel safe.

Getting Used to the Car

Another problem with cat trips to the vet is that they are definitely not used to car rides, adding yet another layer of unfamiliarity to their experience. 

We’re not saying that you should take your cat with you to the drive through to get them used to the car, but you could consider a few minutes with you in a spin around the block to help them associate the car with regular trips and not just the traumatic experience of going to a veterinary care center. Cats can be so dramatic.

The first step was to help your cat get used to the carrier or crate. Now, all you have to do is bring the carrier inside the car. You could even get one of your friends or your partner to help you with this stage.

Turn on your car for a few minutes to help your cat used to the rocking motion inside the car and plan ahead with a few treats, waste bags, more food, and maybe a travel litter box.

As you, or preferably the other person, start driving, soothe your cat and praise them while giving them some treats. You could also give them a toy at this stage to keep them engaged, playing, and happy.

The back seat is a much safer place to do this, so get your friend to start driving and secure the travel carrier next to you in the back seat. One by one, try turning on other things, such as tuning in to your favorite radio station, turning the AC on and off, and anything else that might startle your cat.

A word of caution: don’t do this inside of your garage with the engine on.

Try your first test drive and keep it short. Gradually increase the distances as your cat grows more used to the idea of getting inside the care. This may take a few months, but sooner rather than later, you will have a cat that loves going out for a ride.

Show You Are Comfortable Too

Your pet cares what you think! Be sure to show your cat that you are comfortable with their vet by talking directly to the doctor, making eye contact, and participating in animated conversation. 

is should begin as early as the waiting room. Show your cat that you are relaxed and comfortable in this new space by sitting and speaking calmly, and this will help them feel more at ease.

Your pets will feel more comfortable interacting with other people they see you trust. This is why it’s essential to choose an emergency veterinarian you can trust and stick with them for rutinary treatment.

When you have to go to the vet ER, your pet will know they’re in good hands and know they’re going with a team that’s been taking care of you both.

Make it a Family Affair

Cats often identify each other and familiar spaces by smell, so when you bring one cat to the vet, it can result in a confusing homecoming for your other pets because of the new smells on their furry buddy. 

Whenever possible, try to bring your cats to the vet at the same time. If this is too challenging, be sure to spend some time transitioning your pet who went to the vet from the carrier back into the shared home space to ensure the safety and comfort of all your animals.

End With a Treat

No matter what, taking a trip to the vet is always going to be a bit of a hassle for your kitty! Be sure to reward them with a toy, treat, or extra snuggles and affection when they get back home in order to help them calm back down and restore the peace.

Who to Call for My Cat and Pet Emergency?

We hope these tips were helpful for you and your pets! If you need additional assistance, don’t hesitate to call our office! We are here to help. Our team is ready to help you regardless of the services you and your cat require. 

We want to make sure all pet owners who come to us for help know that our specialists and staff will provide your cat with the highest quality care possible. 

Get in touch with our team to know when you’re coming. We are here to help.

Every cat owner knows how difficult it can be to get your cat to the vet! We may love their personality at home, but cats are often stubborn and uncomfortable in situations where they do not feel that they are in control. Transporting a cat is something that requires a lot of planning, so we want to share some tips with you.

Sometimes, you will have to transport your cat to routinary checkups with the vet or for a veterinary emergency, and the best time to learn how to do so is not right then and there. 

Read along to learn more about what you can do to make cat transportation much easier on you and on your cat.

Traveling With a Cat Carrier

Cats that grow up inside of homes are not very keen on the idea of enclosed spaces, such as travel carriers. This is one of the main reasons why cats are so uncomfortable during their visits to your trusted Trabuco Canyon veterinarian.

They may feel they’re trapped on the confined space of your choice of travel carrier. Still, this is extremely necessary. 

You know how we make sure children are safely buckled up to their car chairs to avoid any accidents with them jumping around? The same is true for cats. Unrestrained cats can be a distraction; a dangerous one at that.

We want to make sure your cat grows used to the space of a travel carrier so they can feel comfortable during any trips you make. Most cats don’t agree with a harness, so the carrier or crate might work best.

We suggest you choose a crate with a wide opening to get them inside without too much trouble. Maybe you should consider one made of plastic or another hard material that’s more sustainable to avoid problems with scratching.

Regardless of the material you choose, one critical factor is space. You want to get a carrier that gives your cat enough space to sit inside and turn around whenever they like.

To get your cat used to the carrier, you could leave it open in your house and place their favorite treats and toys inside so they feel inclined to explore the area. Once your cat feels comfortable going in for treats, try placing their food bowl a bit deeper inside to help your cat explore more of the space. 

The goal is to let the cat stay inside for as long as required and that they’re ok with the idea of going back to a space where they can feel safe.

Getting Used to the Car

Another problem with cat trips to the vet is that they are definitely not used to car rides, adding yet another layer of unfamiliarity to their experience. 

We’re not saying that you should take your cat with you to the drive-through to get them used to the car, but you could consider a few minutes with you in a spin around the block to help them associate the car with regular trips and not just the traumatic experience of going to a veterinary care center. Cats can be so dramatic.

The first step was to help your cat get used to the carrier or crate. Now, all you have to do is bring the carrier inside the car. You could even get one of your friends or your partner to help you with this stage.

Turn on your car for a few minutes to help your cat used to the rocking motion inside the car and plan ahead with a few treats, waste bags, more food, and maybe a travel litter box.

Pet EmergencyAs you, or preferably the other person, start driving, soothe your cat and praise them while giving them some treats. You could also give them a toy at this stage to keep them engaged, playing, and happy.

The back seat is a much safer place to do this, so get your friend to start driving and secure the travel carrier next to you in the back seat. One by one, try turning on other things, such as tuning in to your favorite radio station, turning the AC on and off, and anything else that might startle your cat.

A word of caution: don’t do this inside of your garage with the engine on.

Try your first test drive and keep it short. Gradually increase the distances as your cat grows more used to the idea of getting inside the care. This may take a few months, but sooner rather than later, you will have a cat that loves going out for a ride.

Show You Are Comfortable Too

Your pet cares what you think! Be sure to show your cat that you are comfortable with their vet by talking directly to the doctor, making eye contact, and participating in animated conversation. 

is should begin as early as the waiting room. Show your cat that you are relaxed and comfortable in this new space by sitting and speaking calmly, and this will help them feel more at ease.

Your pets will feel more comfortable interacting with other people they see you trust. This is why it’s essential to choose an emergency veterinarian you can trust and stick with them for rutinary treatment.

When you have to go to the vet ER, your pet will know they’re in good hands and know they’re going with a team that’s been taking care of you both.

Make it a Family Affair

Cats often identify each other and familiar spaces by smell, so when you bring one cat to the vet, it can result in a confusing homecoming for your other pets because of the new smells on their furry buddy. 

Whenever possible, try to bring your cats to the vet at the same time. If this is too challenging, be sure to spend some time transitioning your pet who went to the vet from the carrier back into the shared home space to ensure the safety and comfort of all your animals.

End With a Treat

No matter what, taking a trip to the vet is always going to be a bit of a hassle for your kitty! Be sure to reward them with a toy, treat, or extra snuggles and affection when they get back home in order to help them calm back down and restore the peace.

Who to Call for My Cat and Pet Emergency?

We hope these tips were helpful for you and your pets! If you need additional assistance, don’t hesitate to call our office! We are here to help. Our team is ready to help you regardless of the services you and your cat require. 

We want to make sure all pet owners who come to us for help know that our specialists and staff will provide your cat with the highest quality care possible. 

Get in touch with our team to know when you’re coming. We are here to help.

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